The Trojan Women
Oct 10 2017

The Trojan Women

About the Show

In the days following the Trojan War, how do the women find the will to survive as they await their fate at the hands of the conquering Greeks? A story of women’s strength, hope, and community as their lives are uprooted.

Featuring: Joie Bauer*, Ashley Burroughs*, Julia Greer, Erika Grob, Marcie Henderson*, Sam Leichter*, Cerridwyn McCaffrey, Giverny Petitmermet, Portia Lee Rose, Anna Savant, Alejandra Venancio

 

Directed by Rachel Dart; Dramaturgy by Taylor Beidler; Stage Managed by Melissa Farinelli*; Music by Elizabeth May; Movement by Keri Setaro; Assistant Directed by Alexandra Guhde; Costume Design by Maggie McGrann; Lighting Design by Valerie Insardi; Sound Design by Robert A.K. Gonyo; Set/Prop Design by Dan Morrison

​Shows:
November 1st -18th
Wednesday – Saturday
All shows are at 8:00 pm

​Location:
Balcony Theater 

The Center at West Park
165 W 86th Street, NY, NY 10024
Subways: 1, B, C to 86th St.
•Please note: theater is not wheelchair accessible•

Tickets: $20  | Online or at the door

Equity approved showcase

For more information please visit The New Collectives website.

Please Note: this play includes on stage violence, direct references to sexual violence, and references to the atrocities committed in war.

*appearing courtesy of Actors’ Equity Association

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Jan 12 2016

I’ll Never Love Again

ABOUT THIS SHOW

I’LL NEVER LOVE AGAIN is a theatrical chamber piece about first love, first heartbreak and how those early teenage experiences haunt the rest of our lives – created from the playwright’s actual high school diary. It’s performed by a chorus of 13 people (!!!!) And it ends in late-night coffee, fellowship and music.

 

 

February 24-March 16, 2016

Words by Clare Barron
Music by Stephanie Johnstone

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Oct 23 2015

Jitterbug

ABOUT THIS SHOW

Crudo and Elsie are a Floridian couple who came together share a troubled pasts and a desire to move forward and away from it. They build their new lives on a foundation of mutual commitment and the reliable structures of Christianity and body-building. When Crudo becomes interested in exploring the sexual side of their relationship, the new experiences prove dangerous to them both. The cement of their repressed selves cracks open, and their lives  unexpected trajectories. The story of repression and transformation they experience is told through dance and textually saturated scenes.

 

ABOUT THE ARTISTS

Emma Stanton is a theatre artist working in Chicago and New York. She has worked with many of the Chicago’s best theater companies, including Redmoon Theater, American Theatre Company, About Face Theatre, Steppenwolf Theatre Company, Victory Gardens Theater, Oracle Theater, and Walkabout  Theatre Company (of which she is Associate Artistic Director.) In 2014, she was a semifinalist for a Princess Grace Award for her play Bojko and the Glacier. Her play No Candy will be performed at the Pershing Square Signature  theatre as part of Columbia University’s graduate thesis festival in spring of 2016.

 

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 4 AT 7:30PM

General Admission
$12 in advance
$15 at the door

Students / Seniors
$10

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Sep 23 2015

Hail Oblivion: A Pirate Fantasia

A raucous concert of songs from HAIL OBLIVION
by Joshua William Gelb and Stephanie Johnstone!
**October 12th, one night only, two performances***
First show at 7, Second show at 9:30

 

Buy your ($10) ticket in advance and get a free download code for the HAIL OBLIVION concept album (to be released January 2016)! Tickets live at: hailoblivioninconcert.brownpapertickets.com

 

The cast!
Bryce Pinkham, Rick Burkhardt, Ato Blankson-Wood!
Amber Gray, Nicole Weiss, Eliza Poehlman!
Julian Fleisher, Alex Birnie, Jabari Brisport, Dan Safer!
Brian DeCaluwe, Joshua Hinck, Elias Spector-Zabusky!
Andrew Butler and a chorus of multitudes of additional pirates!

 

The band!
Blake Allen, John Murchison, Beau Edmonson, Dennis Sullivan and Katrina Yaukey!

 

HAIL OBLIVION is an epic pirate adventure that unfurls across the globe and across centuries as three ordinary men from three different eras are connected by the Sirens’ call to the open sea. From the Bahamas (1717), where Major Stede Bonnet deserts his family overnight to become a pirate, to Hollywoodland (1943), where Errol Flynn is arrested and exonerated in a very public statutory rape case, to present day Seattle, where a young advertising executive attempts to sell a luxury cruise in light of a recent Somali-Pirate hostage crisis, this swashbuckling fantasia features a roller coaster score of sea-shanties, jazz, and rock. This outlandish and provocative new piece of music theater takes on our cultural infatuation with piracy, challenging the tantalizing prospect of shedding moral, legal, and social obligations in pursuit of individual freedom upon the high seas.

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Sep 15 2015

Julliard Callback!!

Just found out I made final callbacks for the Juilliard MFA Acting program. I will join 50 actors (25 MFA / 25 BFA) out of 2200 for a three day callback workshop weekend. Regardless of what happens it will be an amazing experience.

 

Juilliard facilitated one of the most generous, exhausting, playful, heart-breaking, selfless, inspiring, soul-shaking weekends I have had the privilege of experiencing. My artistic soul is renewed.

“Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better.” – Samuel Beckett


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May 29 2014

Play for Today: West Lethargy

west_lethargyToday is the birthday of the excellent actor Joie Bauer (who you can follow on Facebook). Joie has appeared in a number of plays featured on Indie Theater Now, but today, in his honor, we shine the spotlight on the very first one I ever saw him in, which is West Lethargy by Stephen Kaliski.

 

In West Lethargy, Joie played Ringle, a man who has come west, with his wife Nugget, at least partly to try to find Nugget’s brother, who has disappeared in this nameless area in the middle of America on his way to California. Ringle and Nugget chance to meet another couple, Ellie and Turner, who likewise has stopped in this place, perhaps only temporarily–or perhaps they will go to California themselves.

 

Steve’s play is filled with enigmas and mysteries as it ponders some of the myths and truths at the root of this country of ours. In my review, which I wrote after seeing West Lethargy at FringeNYC back in 2010, I wrote:

West Lethargy's characters sometimes seem like they should be archetypal, but they're not; they're as individual as Americans are supposed to be, and they each have their own strong desires to invent themselves and their own mythologies. Sometimes this allows for connection among them and sometimes it makes for an ineffable kind of aloneness.

And here’s Steve himself on the themes of the play:

Like the four siblings of Three Sisters and the talking heads of Beckett, the two couples of West Lethargy can richly imagine their destinations, but when it comes to actually moving their feet, they’re left looking out the window, confined by that pervasive longing that so defines this theatre of the stuck. These stories remind us that planning an endpoint is not the easiest step of the journey. In fact, it can be the most suffocating.

West Lethargy is fascinating and filled with beautiful, lyrical writing. It also owed much of its success to its strong cast, which included, in addition to Joie Bauer,  Jeffrey Feola, Graham Halstead, Mikaela Feely-Lehmann and Suzanne Lenz. I hope you will check it out on Indie Theater Now!

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Sep 28 2013

Reasons Y “I’m Single”

A COMEDY WEB SERIES

About being SINGLE, OVER 35 & UNDER Fabulous

Joan, Doris and Gina are unlikely friends that met decades ago at BANANA SPLITS summer camp. Banana Splits is a therapy group for kids of divorce. Now in their 30s and living in NYC the women share experiences and wonder Y they are single.

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Jun 13 2013

North To Maine

Description: An impromptu fellowship of hikers struggles with the elements, each other, and their own pasts as they journey 2,180 miles through the American wilderness, from Georgia north to Maine.
Year Written/Copyrighted: 2013
Date Added: 6/10/2013
Content Advisory: Swearing, male nudity, mild sex scene
2 Acts, 150 Minutes
1 Female, 4 Males

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May 03 2013

Turtle Hill, Brooklyn

A great review for this indie feature I was honored to be a part of, Turtle Hill, Brooklyn. It has a limited run in NYC coming up on May 3rd. Check out the page for more info.

 

If I were to fantasize the ideal LGBT film, there’s a pretty good chance it would resemble the engaging, thought-provoking and emotionally honest Turtle Hill, Brooklyn, a low-budget indie gem that captured the Audience Award for Best Narrative Feature at NewFest and has had screenings at Philly’s QFest, Seattle LGBT Film Festival, ImageOut, Palm Springs’ Cinema Diverse and quite a few others. Now, the film will open in New York City on May 3rd.

 

You want to see this film.

Will (Brian W. Seibert) and Mateo (Ricardo Valdez) are a seemingly perfect couple preparing to host a 30th birthday party for Will in their shared Brooklyn home. The day gets a bit of a jarring start, however, when Will’s sister Molly (Jeanne Slater) unexpectedly drops by with her husband and kid and in the process Will gets abruptly outed. This emotionally complex scene is in stark contrast to the rest of the film, a weaving together of the everyday lives and the everyday lies that couples from all walks of life tell themselves and each other as a matter of routine.
What’s refreshing about Turtle Hill, Brooklyn is that it’s that rare LGBT drama that’s comfortable enough in its own skin to welcome in the rest of the world. The friends who gather with Will and Mateo are gay and straight, young and old, male and female and beyond.

 

The common factor? Will, Mateo and the masks that we all wear in our daily lives.

While there isn't a weak link among the ensemble, particularly strong turns are offered by Joie Bauer, Maryll Botula, Jeanne Slater, Deidre MacNamara and others.

Director Ryan Gielen shoots the film with a sort of breezy and relaxed self-assurance that perfectly complements the film’s mixture of deep, revealing truths and casual conversations. It makes sense, perhaps, that the film feels so authentic given that it’s penned by its two co-leads, Seibert and Valdez. Amidst the discovery of hidden secrets and big and little lies, this group of friends has the conversations that we all have when we get together – politics, drugs, sex, relationships, getting old, staying thin and more. So often in this type of film, we get histrionic revelations and hyped up dramas, but Seibert and Valdez have crafted a story that’s compelling because it feels so incredibly normal.

 

The film takes place over the course of a day, and Gielen wisely confines the action to Will and Mateo’s home and outdoor patio area. While such an approach could feel restricting or staged, instead it gives the film an intimacy that makes the revelations that follow have that much more impact. Andrew Rivara’s lensing feels as intimate as the film’s dialogue, an approach that gives the film an occasional “home movie” feeling.

 

For the record, that’s a compliment.

 

To top everything off, both Seibert and Valdez are absolutely terrific as Will and Mateo. There’s never a moment where this doesn’t feel like a real relationship with all its intimacies, niceties, half-truths and moments of raw vulnerability. To their credit, both Seibert and Valdez present authentic and well-rounded characters who are neither all good nor all bad – they are simply human beings living out their lives amongst all the dramas, conflicts, lies and pinatas that life can offer. The best compliment I can give a film that centers around a relationship is that I can’t imagine this film without either Seibert or Valdez – While only time will tell if Will and Mateo belong together, there’s no question that the performances of these two actors belong in this film.

 

It’s also a rare film that cares enough about the supporting characters to give them moments to shine and develop as well, but such is the case with Turtle Hill, Brooklyn. While there isn’t a weak link among the ensemble, particularly strong turns are offered by Joie Bauer, Maryll Botula, Jeanne Slater, Deidre MacNamara and others.

 

Turtle Hill, Brooklyn is a special film that exudes an honesty, authenticity and transparency that is rare even among the more transparent indie fare. There will be times you laugh, times you think, perhaps times you shed a tear and even times you reflect upon your own life wherever you’re at in that life. That’s special, and that’s why one can only hope that Turtle Hill, Brooklyn gets the attention it deserves in theatrical release.

© Written by Richard Propes
The Independent Critic

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